SizeUp
The missing window manager
SizeUp allows you to quickly resize and position your windows with keyboard shortcuts or a handy menu bar icon.
Why You Need SizeUp for Window Management

Arranging windows on Mac OS X is tedious and imprecise. Even after dragging, pulling, and, re-dragging windows, you end up with inefficient use of your available screen real estate.

SizeUp will help you quickly resize and position your windows to make optimal use of your screen while saving you time and frustration.

SizeUp at Your Command

SizeUp comes with a number of pre-defined actions for resizing and/or moving the frontmost window of almost any application.

Safari, Finder, Pages, it doesn't matter, SizeUp will work its magic to help wrangle your windows into place.

Split Screen Actions

Move and resize a window to fill the Left, Right, Top (Up), or Bottom (Down) half of the screen.

Great for putting two windows side by side for comparison.

Quarter Screen Actions

Move and resize a window to fill a quarter of the screen (quadrant).

Great for managing files in Finder.


Multi-Monitor & Spaces Actions

Move a window from one monitor to another and optionally resize the window to fit.

Move a window from one Space to another.

Other Actions

My favorite, Full Screen maximizes a window to fill your screen, unlike that annoying green button.

SnapBack restores a window to its original size/position before SizeUp touched it.

SizeUp Is Highly Configurable
Margins

Reserve space at the edges of your screen, which is great for accessing desktop icons.

Add some distance between windows to avoid shadow overlap.

Partitions

By default, SizeUp splits your screen in half, right down the middle, but you can configure the partition to whatever you like. Maybe it feels like a 30/70 day?

Global Keyboard Shortcuts

Trigger SizeUp actions in any application with user-configurable, global keyboard shortcuts.

What People Are Saying

MacWorld 3.5 Mice
[SizeUp] can improve your productivity if you frequently work with multiple windows simultaneously.
Dan Frakes, MacWorld